Drawing

Little sketchbook bits

From meetings, tea times and journeys

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Bristol, Cycling

Now Say Hello Back – MAKING LONDON MORE SOCIABLE ONE HELLO AT A TIME

In lots of places, lots of people are doing some extraordinary things. This morning, after a good long Skype with my sister in New Zealand, I knew I wanted to do some blogging, find some new stuff, get on twitter, snoop around the internet a bit. So here’s a great thing I found:

 
Now Say Hello is a one-man mission to make London more sociable via a bicycle. Bruno Clarke cycles a lot and has created a point-scoring system for human interaction whilst on his journeys:


Me saying hello – 1 point
Getting a response – 5 points (unless it’s aggressive or rude)
Getting a conversation – 10 points
Getting a joke – 20 points


He’s noting down his efforts and scores on the blog, like this:

Saturday 10th July

60 points – ok so it’s a slightly made up number, but I think it’s fairly representative of the day.  I cycled 117 kilometres to Brighton with many a country hello and nod along the way.  Was a lovely ride.  It’s no Tour de France, but I was still pretty please for a lone effort on a hot day.

Thursday 8th July

5 points – after my fellow cyclists, a lady in red, was barked at by an enfuriated oncoming rider, we shared a little “well good morning to him too” as I cycled past.  A jolly end to an aggressive start.  Some people just get on the wrong side of their saddle don’t they.

I’m inspired by this and want to start my own mission – both whilst cycling around Bristol and walking around, and I’ll even count when I’m in my car – most people have their windows wound down in the sun.

Join in yourself. Lets collate results.

Follow on Now Say Hello on Twitter – @nowsayhello
Follow on me on Twitter – @lucybarfoot

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Barfoot and Duggan, Bristol, Thoughts

Two Lucy’s One Happiness

A while ago, us Lucy and I had an interview with Megan Cara. We just found it, and it made a lovely read! Thank you Megan!

“Their attitude toward art and people and the world is what i found to be most intriguing about them. Lucy Duggan has a degree in Sociology from Bristol University and has been a Bristol resident for 9 years. Lucy Barfoot has a fine arts degree from the University of Creative Arts which is in Surrey.

The two women are just so positive and excited to be doing what they are doing. They explained to me that they have a very naive approach to things, but knowingly naive. They have accomplished a lot with this outlook. For their collaborative list installation they sent letters to many organizations and people asking for lists. Even to the Queen of England! They are cheeky and silly and people find it charming.

Their latest collaboration is called Light Box, a series of workshops they are assembling. The workshops are a combination of positive psychology and creativity, ultimately helping people live a more happy life. Their passion for happiness is truly inspiring. They are holding test workshops now and will be piloting the project in March.

My interview with them turned into a casual conversation about life, happiness, art, and Bristol. I had a wonderful time chatting with them. I wanted to get their point of view on street art in the UK and Bristol, since that is what my original inspiration was for the blog… They both commented that the street art in Bristol is changing all the time, and really is beautiful. Some of it is allowed, and there are even designated areas for the artwork, but some people do find themselves in a lot of trouble for it. Barfoot commented that she doesn’t see Banksy as “some big thing.” Duggan expressed interest in temporary street art, images made with baking flour or sugar paper that disappear in the rain, this takes care of the possibility of getting in trouble.

Over all it was wonderful to speak with such positive and open minded artists. The one thing that stuck with me most was something one of them said – more relating to life. We were discussing having bad friends, or toxic relationships and how that very much effects one’s happiness, and one of the Lucys said something like…as soon as i realised that i couldn’t do anything to change how other people live their lives, it was much easier for me to live my own life happily. Lets all take a page out of their book.”

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