Art, color, Process

Melting down oil pastels and crayons

 

 

This started as me making a ‘creative tutorial’ for the Light Box blog, but turns out that I didn’t feel very excited nor energised about making a step-by-step tutorial and wanted more of a chance to experiment and have fun with it.

So away I went, not worrying about an end-point, not worried about photographing every little step. There is this thing (all over Pinterest and craft blogs) where you can melt down old ends of oil pastels, combine with crayons to help solidify and bind, then cook for just 10 minutes in the oven at 100 degrees, and you can make a whole new crayon/oil pastels out of whichever colours you like.

But I like what I made more then that – more of an object (plus it’s crap to use as a crayon!) reminds me of using resin, makes me want to take this further and try to set objects within the melted down waxes. Could I float little objects in grey pastels, so it’s barely visible, like smog? What about just using wax? Those are notes to self!

I did take some pictures. The slicing of the oil pastels was a wonderful experience. An unusual texture – very satisfying.

DSCF1003 DSCF1008 DSCF1013 DSCF1014 DSCF1016 DSCF1018

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color, Drawing

Colouring in Hexagons

A beautiful new book, bought in the bookshop attached to the wonderful MACBA – Barcelona’s Museum of Contemporary Art. It’s a notebook with HEXAGON PAPER. That’s right, tiny little hexagons just waiting to be coloured in or for a story to be written, a word in each hexagon. It’s made by ‘Paperways’. I’m excited about the book, and I hear that my delightful friend and fellow creative Angela Chick is using hers now too. We had a little hiatus because the books are so beautiful – you know when you put off using them because they’re so nice.

The notebooks can be bought on Amazon here or here on the InkThistle website – you can see the other lovely Paperways products here too.

Here’s what I have done so far. I seriosly need to get better at colouring within the lines. But those hexagons are very small you see. Drawing with my trusty Pilot 0.4, a very sharp pencil and my ‘Zig Kurecolor’ graphic pens which was given to me as the best Christmas present ever. More about those pens right here.

Hexagon

Hexagon 7 Hexagon 6  Hexagon 4

Hexagon 3

Hexagon

Hexagon 2   Hexagon  3

Working out which pens I can use and which I can’t. Some of them bleed too much into the paper you see. I wanted to use light and subtle colours only.

Hexagon 2

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